entertainment

Gays on TV: Your guide to the week's best LGBT TV and film

Here's what not to miss on the box this week.

2019-10-11

Words: Hugh Kaye

There’s no doubt about the highlight for the week ahead as Moonlight (C4, Sat 12 Oct, 9pm) gets its British TV premiere.

With some astonishing performances, the Oscar-winning film tells of a young black man’s sexual awakening - and was the subject of one of the biggest cock-ups in Academy Award history when the winner of Best Picture was accidentally announced as La La Land back in 2017.

Also not to be missed is Why We Hate (Discovery, Sun 13 Oct, 10pm). With Steven Spielberg as one of the executive producers, this documentary series looks at where this most primal of human emotions comes from, its history and how it spreads, and features homophobia as well as religious, ethnic and class hatred.

Elsewhere, as mentioned last week, two-part documentary Drag Kids (5Star, Thurs 17 Oct, 9pm) should be worth watching as three boys - aged nine, 10 and 12 - follow their dreams of becoming drag queens.

Meanwhile, there’s big trouble ahead for Robron in Emmerdale (ITV, Tues Oct 15, 7pm). As Rob realises he has to flee the village, husband Aaron tells he won’t be going alone…

There are two programmes that should be of interest to our lesbian readers. The Handmaiden (Film 4, Thurs 17 Oct, 11pm) is a re-imagining of Sarah Waters’ best-selling tale Fingersmith, transported to 1930’s Korea.

 

And The Lesbian Guide to Straight Sex (C5, Mon 14 Oct, 10pm), pretty much does what it says on the tin as gay women help two heterosexual couples improve their love lives.

With 2019’s Attitude Awards having just taken place, a former winner can be seen belting out her hits in The Live Lounge with Charli XCX (BBC4, Fri 18 Oct, 7.30pm), and finally, although it’s been on before, I have no hesitation in recommending The Imitation Game (Film 4, Sun 13 Oct, 6.35pm).

For those who don’t know the based-on-real-life story, it looks at how mathematical genius Alan Turing helped save hundreds of thousands of lives by breaking the German’s enigma code during World War II - for which he was rewarded with persecution and chemical castration because he happened to be gay.